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The Deepest Dive in Antarctica Reveals a Sea Floor Teeming With Life

June 2, 2019
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http://www.oceanx.orghttp://www.instagram.com/oceanxhttp://www.facebook.com/oceanxorghttp://www.twitter.com/oceanx No one really knows what’s in the deep ocean in Antarctica. Now we have the technology to reach into the ocean depths, we accompanied scientist and deep-sea explorer Jon Copley and became the first to descend to 1000 meters underwater in Antarctica for Blue Planet II. The exotic creatures we found there will astonish you. This video is a part of Our Blue Planet, a joint venture between OceanX and BBC Earth to get people talking about the ocean. Join the conversation on Twitter: @OurBluePlanet. #oceanx#alucia#antarctica#submarines Director: Mark Dalio Director of Photography (AP): Janssen Powers Director of Photography (BBC): Ted Giffords 2nd Camera/Drone Op: James DuBourdieu Field Audio: Mike Kasic Production Manager: Samantha Loshiavo Associate Producer: Marjorie Crowley Editors: Ryan Quinn, Brian Golding, Janssen Powers Colorist: James DuBourdieu Sound Re-recording Mixer: Ryan Quinn Assistant Editor: Jorge Alvarez Post Production Supervisor: Brian Golding Executive Producer: Jennifer Hile

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Antarctica (UK/ænˈtɑːrktɪkə/ or /ænˈtɑːrtɪkə/US/æntˈɑːrktɪkə/ (listen))[note 1] is Earth‘s southernmost continent. It contains the geographic South Poleand is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,200,000 square kilometres (5,500,000 square miles), it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. At 0.00008 people per square kilometre, it is by far the least densely populated continent. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km (1.2 mi; 6,200 ft) in thickness,[5] which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents.[6] Most of Antarctica is a polar desert, with annual precipitation of only 200 mm (8 in) along the coast and far less inland.[7] The temperature in Antarctica has reached −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F) (or even −94.7 °C (−135.8 °F) as measured from space[8]), though the average for the third quarter (the coldest part of the year) is −63 °C (−81 °F). Anywhere from 1,000 to 5,000 people reside throughout the year at research stations scattered across the continent. Organisms native to Antarctica include many types of algaebacteriafungiplantsprotista, and certain animals, such as mitesnematodespenguinsseals and tardigrades. Vegetation, where it occurs, is tundra.

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