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TIMELAPSE OF THE ENTIRE UNIVERSE

March 7, 2018
792 Views

TIMELAPSE OF THE ENTIRE UNIVERSE

On a cosmic time scale, human history is as brief as the blink of an eye. By compressing all 13.8 billion years of time into a 10 minute scale, this video shows just how young we truly are, and just how ancient and vast our universe us. Starting with the big bang and culminating in the appearance of homo sapiens, this experience follows the unfolding of time at 22 million years per second, adhering strictly as possible to current scientific understanding.

Narration by Morgan Freeman, Brian Cox, Carl Sagan, David Attenborough.

Concept, music, editing, sound design, and select VFX by melodysheep. @musicalscience

In addition to custom footage, this video samples a large library of content from many sources, including NASA, Voyage of Time, Cosmic Voyage, Wonders of the Universe, and more.

It can be difficult to fathom how long 13.8 billion years is. The more you watch this video, the more it sinks in just how stunningly old the universe is, and how magnificently tiny we humans are in the grand scheme. I hope seeing this experiment in humility makes you ponder the vast, unwitnessed ages that have passed before we came along, and the brevity of our existence in comparison.

Every event featured in this video is fascinating on its own, so I highly encourage anybody interested to dig deeper. Start with the Wikipedia page on geologic time and go from there to learn more about all the events featured within.

Peace and love,

melodysheep

Evolution is change in the heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations.[1][2] Evolutionary processes give rise to biodiversity at every level of biological organisation, including the levels of species, individual organisms, and molecules.[3]

Repeated formation of new species (speciation), change within species (anagenesis), and loss of species (extinction) throughout the evolutionary history of life on Earth are demonstrated by shared sets of morphological and biochemical traits, including shared DNA sequences.[4] These shared traits are more similar among species that share a more recent common ancestor, and can be used to reconstruct a biological “tree of life” based on evolutionary relationships (phylogenetics), using both existing species and fossils. The fossil record includes a progression from early biogenic graphite,[5] to microbial mat fossils,[6][7][8] to fossilised multicellular organisms. Existing patterns of biodiversity have been shaped both by speciation and by extinction.[9]

The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model for the universe[1] from the earliest known periodsthrough its subsequent large-scale evolution.[2][3][4] The model describes how the universe expanded from a very high-density and high-temperature state,[5][6] and offers a comprehensive explanation for a broad range of phenomena, including the abundance of light elements, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), large scale structure and Hubble’s law.[7] If the known laws of physics are extrapolated to the highest density regime, the result is a singularity which is typically associated with the Big Bang. Physicists are undecided whether this means the universe began from a singularity, or that current knowledge is insufficient to describe the universe at that time. Detailed measurements of the expansion rate of the universe place the Big Bang at around 13.8 billionyears ago, which is thus considered the age of the universe.[8] After the initial expansion, the universe cooled sufficiently to allow the formation of subatomic particles, and later simple atoms. Giant clouds of these primordial elements later coalesced through gravity in halos of dark matter, eventually forming the stars and galaxies visible today.

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